Speech Balloons & Thought Bubbles

 

cartoon+bubble

Someday, I will find a better system of tracking my citations. I bet that's what he's thinking, too. He didn't even have the benefit of the reverse-image-search (which, for the record, turned up nothing!).

Someday, I will find a better system of tracking my citations. I bet that’s what he’s thinking, too. He didn’t even have the benefit of the reverse-image-search (which, for the record, turned up nothing!).

exclamation mark

original

"Words can be vicious." Cinders McLeod, Globe and Mail, 2002, as seen in Canada Caricature edited by Terry Mosher.

“Words can be vicious.” Cinders McLeod, Globe and Mail, 2002, as seen in Canada Caricature edited by Terry Mosher.

Cartoon Movement

Cartoon Movement

1 2

"Life of Thought," SMBC Comics

“Life of Thought,” SMBC Comics

4

 

Argument, Sherif Arafa, Cartoon Movement, 30 May 2013

Argument, Sherif Arafa, Cartoon Movement, 30 May 2013

"The Truth," Sherif Arafa, Cartoon Movement, 7 May 2012

“The Truth,” Sherif Arafa, Cartoon Movement, 7 May 2012

Cartoon Movement

Cartoon Movement

The New Yorker 1976

The New Yorker, 1976

The New Yorker 1989

The New Yorker, 1989

Cartoon Movement

Cartoon Movement

Cartoon Movement

Cartoon Movement

“War Isn’t Fought in the Headlines,” Christopher Vorlet, 2005

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Part III: John Bull & Uncle Sam, a friendship to the end

[Part I: Representations of the US & UK]

[Part II: Representations of UK & US Cooperation]

As persistent readers may have gathered, I’m mildly fixated on national representations. We’ve already seen John Bull sharing his tandem bicycle with Uncle Sam, and we’ve seen the US tell John Bull to mind his own business. Here are three cartoons showing John Bull making way for (and encouraging) Uncle Sam in a legacy of colonialism and imperial consumption:

Uncle Sam's Temptation [to try John Bull's menu of "conquest & foreign aggression" rather than his own "anti-annexation broth" & Monroe Doctrine," Clifford Berryman, c. 1898.

Uncle Sam’s Temptation [to try John Bull’s menu of “conquest & foreign aggression” rather than his own “anti-annexation broth” & Monroe Doctrine,” Clifford Berryman, c. 1898.

Latin Amer in Caricature - UK and US

“Accepting the Monroe Doctrine: John Bull gratefully admits that Uncle Sam is the proper custodian of the Western Hemisphere.” Homer Davenport, Review of Reviews, January 1902, as seen in Latin America in Caricature by John J. Johnson (page 37).

From "Caricatures and cartoons published during the Spanish-American war, 1898" (LOT 7862), US Library of Congress.

From “Caricatures and cartoons published during the Spanish-American war, 1898″ (LOT 7862), US Library of Congress.

This wraps up the posts about the US and UK / Uncle Sam and John Bull (for now!) so we can move on to Canada (my favo[u]rite)!

For further reading (and images!), check out the US Library of Congress exhibit “John Bull and Uncle Sam: Four Centuries of British-American Relations.”

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Policy Brief on Canada-U.S. Education Initiatives

In case you are somehow unaware of the work of the North America Research Partnership (come on, get it together!), here’s an introduction to a policy brief that I worked on with the organization (the piece just came out today!):

NARP

U.S.-Canada Educational Exchange:
Academic Alliances and Opportunities

By Amanda Murphyao

As is the case with the U.S. and Mexico, the U.S. and Canada have long had a cross-border flow of post-secondary students and educators. However, important initiatives are currently underway in Canada and the U.S. to recruit and retain international scholars.

Due to the expansion of post-secondary education programs and the demands of a globalized economy, Canada and the U.S. share a growing interest in cross-border academic initiatives, such as international student enrollment and outreach to professionals in the field of education. According to a 2013 report by World Education Services, the enrollment of international undergraduate students in the U.S. and Canada has grown by 40 to 50 percent in the past decade.

To read the rest of the policy brief, click here.

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Part II: Representations of UK & US Cooperation

[Part I: Representations of the US & UK]

The United Kingdom and the United States (or John Bull and Uncle Sam, respectively) get along (in)famously now:

"It ought to be a happy new year Uncle Sam and his English cousin have the world between them," Victor Gillam, Judge, 7 January 1899.

“It ought to be a happy new year Uncle Sam and his English cousin have the world between them,” Victor Gillam, Judge, 7 January 1899.

"The see-saw nations--The Anglo-Saxons balance of power," Victor Gillam, Judge, 9 April 1898

“The see-saw nations–The Anglo-Saxons balance of power,” Victor Gillam, Judge, 9 April 1898

"The White Man's Burden (Apologies to Kipling)," Victor Gillam, Judge, 1899.

“The White Man’s Burden (Apologies to Kipling),” Victor Gillam, Judge, 1899. (As seen in The Forbidden Book: The Philippine-American War in Cartoons, courtesy of AL.)

And they collaborate against Russia, their former go-between:

As seen in The Nineteenth Century in Caricature (1904).

As seen in The History of the Nineteenth Century in Caricature (1904).

russian cartoon

"Russia: 'How I hate that song!'" Edwin Marcus, c. 1950s.

“Russia: ‘How I hate that song!'” Edwin Marcus, c. 1950s.

[Part III: John Bull & Uncle Sam, a friendship to the end]

For further reading (and images!), check out the US Library of Congress exhibit “John Bull and Uncle Sam: Four Centuries of British-American Relations.”

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Part I: Representations of the US & UK

Sometimes, the US and the UK don’t get on particularly well (see, for example: American Revolutionary War, also known as the Battle of the Upstart Colonists in British textbooks).

"POOR OLD ENGLAND endeavoring to reclaim his wicked AMERICAN CHILDREN=and therefore is England maimed & forc’d to go with a Staff. shakespeare," April 1777.

POOR OLD ENGLAND endeavoring to reclaim his wicked AMERICAN CHILDREN and therefore is England maimed & forc’d to go with a Staff. shakespeare,” April 1777.

"John Bull Making a new batch of ships to send to the lake," William Charles, c 1814

“John Bull Making a new batch of ships to send to the lake,” William Charles, c 1814

"What? You young Yankee-noodle, strike your own father!" 1846

“What? You young Yankee-noodle, strike your own father!” 1846

"Ultimatum on the Oregon question," 1846.

“Ultimatum on the Oregon question,” 1846.

But they’ve become thick as thieves (in most of the meanings of the word) despite (or because?) of the miles between them:

"The laying of the cable---John and Jonathan joining hands," c. 1858.

“The laying of the cable—John and Jonathan joining hands,” c. 1858.

c. 1898 sheet music

c. 1898 sheet music

1898 poster.

Another 1898 poster.

John Bull and Uncle Sam, c. 1900

John Bull and Uncle Sam, c. 1900

"The Fable of John Bull and Uncle Sam," 1900.

“The Fable of John Bull and Uncle Sam,” 1900.

"Time for a new declaration," John R. Fischetti, Collier's, 4 July 1953.

“Time for a new declaration,” John R. Fischetti, Collier’s, 4 July 1953.

eng2eng

And they’re often on the same side!

[Part II: Representations of UK & US Cooperation]

[Part III: John Bull & Uncle Sam, a friendship to the end]

For further reading (and images!), check out the US Library of Congress exhibit “John Bull and Uncle Sam: Four Centuries of British-American Relations.”

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Representations of British Imperial Expansion

The other day, we had a look at some images of Uncle Sam’s rapid, rather unsightly, growth. Today’s post features images of British imperial expansion through large char(ic)atures (yes, that was deliberate):

"The English World Kingdom, or Bloody Cartography," Lustige Blatter, as seen in "The History of the Nineteenth Century in Caricature"

“The English World Kingdom, or Bloody Cartography,” from Lustige Blatter, as seen in The History of the Nineteenth Century in Caricature (1904)

"The first kiss this ten years," Gillray, January 1803

“The first kiss this ten years,” Gillray, January 1803

"Greedy Johnnie," J.S. Pughe, Puck, 19 February 1896

Greedy Johnnie,” J.S. Pughe, Puck, 19 February 1896, via the United States of America’s Library of Congress

But never fear, the US and UK can also operate as imperial powers in tandem! (Coming up next.)

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Representations of US Imperial Expansion

In consolidating my dissertation research, I re-discovered several cartoons equating imperial expansion with Uncle Sam’s increasing large-ness (not to be conflated with largess, all the puns intended):

"Uncle Sam's Not the Only Expansionist on the Bench," Clifford K. Berryman, 20 December 1898

“Uncle Sam’s Not the Only Expansionist on the Bench,” Clifford K. Berryman, 20 December 1898 (figure on the right is Henry Watterson)

"Uncle Sam: Too late, my boys I've already expanded," Clifford K. Berryman, 14 September 1899

“Uncle Sam: Too late, my boys I’ve already expanded,” Clifford K. Berryman, 14 September 1899

Peter Gries explains the cartoon above in "The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives Over Foreign Affairs"

Peter Gries explains Berryman’s cartoon in “The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives Over Foreign Affairs” (2014)

Cigar box Uncle Sam is getting pretty big for his britches.

Cigar box Uncle Sam is getting pretty big for his britches.

"Declined with thanks," J.S. Pughe, Puck, 5 September 1900

“Declined with thanks,” J.S. Pughe, Puck, 5 September 1900

“A lesson for anti-expansionists: showing how Uncle Sam has been an expansion first, last, and all the time,” Victor Gillam, Judge, 1899

“A lesson for anti-expansionists: showing how Uncle Sam has been an expansion first, last, and all the time,” Victor Gillam, Judge, 1899

LOT 7862, Library of Congress

LOT 7862, Library of Congress

"Now, will he let go?" Walter McDougall, New York Evening Journal

“Now, will he let go?” Walter McDougall, New York Evening Journal

“1776, 1830, 1867, 1898, ?” Life, 26 January 1899, in "Barbaric Intercourse" by Martha Banta (2003, page 211)

“1776, 1830, 1867, 1898, ?” Life, 26 January 1899, as seen in Barbaric Intercourse by Martha Banta (2003, page 211)

Next up, we’ll have a look at versions of greed, expansion, and imperialism featuring Canada, the UK, and the US and the UK working together.

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Hats off (and on)

Ann Telnaes, 2001

Ann Telnaes, 2001

Aislin, 2013

Aislin, 2013

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Yesterday was a big day for maritime history in Canada and the U.S.

Can we – just for a moment – consider why boats might have anniversaries or submarines might be celebrated as momentous “on this day in history” occasions on Twitter?

30 September 2014

30 September 2014. I know, I know, it’s called a “ship.”

30 September 2014

30 September 2014. The U.S. Navy: keepin’ it real. Real radioactive.

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“[M]ap-obsessed, to a degree quite uncharacteristic of middle America”

A while back, I read an exchange about a book (and review) that really stuck with me. The article, in the journal Cartographica, was a “Review Article of Denis Wood’s The Power of Maps and the Author’s Reply” by Barbara Belyea, with a response from Denis Wood.

It’s kind of an amazing exchange (as in, I am left amazed by it), and interested folks can go read it in Cartographica (volume 29, numbers 3 & 4, 1992, pages 94-99), if you have institutional access to the journal. So much happens in there, but for now I’ll just focus on Wood’s “call for an ethnography of map use among contemporary Americans.”

In the spirit of attending to “map immersion,” I’ve been collecting maps that I notice in passing on websites, road signs, license plates, product labels, t-shirts, and other sources. Someone (TM) was surprised to learn about some of the places where I found maps, so I thought I’d share some URL / address bar maps to offer a nod to the pervasive (dare I use the phrase?) nature of maps.

alabama VT

deleware

 (This one’s on the page, rather than in the browser address bar.)

url mi

tx wisc

nv

ca7

maine

ushapia

 (Images link to more maps!)

Granted, the process of collecting ALL of the maps that I come across has become a bit tedious to friends and family members (“PULL OVER I HAVE TO TAKE A PICTURE OF THE STICKER ON THAT TRUCK!” “No! We are on the highway! Close the door! What is wrong with you?! I thought grad students were supposed to be smart!”), but it has been interesting to attend to the banal and persistence presence of maps.

jmr

Are there maps everywhere? (Decoration in my aunt and uncle’s condo.) What are the implications of representation for understanding environmental history, colonialism, and contemporary geospatially-rooted identity politics? Also, where did they get that, it is cool.

Are maps reminders of place, signals of identity, signals of colonialism, or just pretty decorations? Stay tuned for the stunning conclusion. (Spoiler: probably all four and more, depending on the context!)

PS

In case you thought I forgot about Canada (and, really, how could you think that?), here’s your Canadian content in the form of a URL map-as-logo / icon:

nlnu

(Unlike the address bars above, this doesn’t link to any additional images right now because I’m password protecting / hoarding all of my dissertation research until The Thing is DONE.)

UPDATE:

MN

Keep coming across more of these…

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